Tomas & Svecz Family History

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This site is devoted to the genealogy of the Tomas (became Thomas in the U.S.A.) and Svecz (became Swetz in the U.S.A.) families that emigrated to the USA from Bercsenyifalva (in Ung County), Hungary.  The town was also known as Dubrinics in Czechoslovakia and then still later as Dubrynyc, now located in western Ukraine northeast of Uzhgorod (informational sites: Welcome to Uzhgorod and Old Ungvar) in the Transcarpathian region.  The families also had connections to the town just south of Dubrinics--Zaricovo or Zaricso (Drugethaza in Hungarian, Zarica in Rusyn, now known as Zariceve in the Ukraine).  The Tomas and Svecs family members were Carpatho-Rusyns (also known as Rusyns or Ruthenians) who emigrated to the Scranton, Pennsylvania area.

Alternative spellings of Tomas include Tomasz, Tamas, and Tamasz.  An alternative spelling of Svecz is Svecs.

Frank Thomas was born as Fedor Tomas in Dubrinics, Hungary on 3/1/1884.  He sailed on the S.S. Bremen from Bremen on 9/12/1903 arriving in New York City on 9/22/03.  Frank married Mary Swetz on 6/1/1907 in Dunmore, PA.  Frank was naturalized as a U.S. citizen on 9/18/1924 in Scranton, PA.  Frank Thomas died at the age of 63 on 12/19/1947 in Moosic, PA.  See Photo and Stone.  Frank Thomas' parents were Andrew Tomas and Julia Puthonoski or Podhorycki (Bobinchak or Babinecz is another related name according to a family story). 
     Frank Thomas had a sister named Anna who married Charles Stelicha (Stelika, Stilika).  Anna Tomas arrived in New York City on 9/13/1911 on S.S. Oceania from Trieste enroute to her cousin Mary Penyak in Scranton, PA.  In 1920 and 1930, the Stelicha family lived on Friend St. in Port Griffith, PA.  Charles Stelicha immigrated from a town (that was east of Zaricso) called Vil'synky (Egreshat in Hungarian).     

Mary Swetz was born as Maria Svecz in Dubrinics, Hungary about 1886.  She sailed on the S.S. Slavonia from Fiume on 9/20/1906 arriving in New York City on 10/10/1906 enroute to her brother-in-law Vasily Rigan at 410 Washington Ave., Scranton, PA.  Mary was naturalized as a U.S. citizen on 6/29/1943 in Scranton, PA.  Mary Thomas died at the age of 86 on 12/8/1974 in Moosic, PA.  See Photo and Stone
     Mary Swetz' parents were George Svecz and Bertha (Borka).  Borka Gerzanich sailed on the S.S. Switzerland from Antwerp on 5/14/1896 arriving in Philadelphia on 5/28/1896 enroute to brother-in-law Vasil Rigjan in Scranton PA.  Borka had been in Scranton previously in 1891-1892.  Borka Gerzanich, age 28, was traveling with Fedor Gerzanich, age 39, (Gerzanics, Gerzanic, Gerzanicz) who is believed to be her second husband.  Borka ran a boarding house in the lower part of Dunmore (in a section known as the Patch) until Fedor died walking along a railroad track (in a town starting with the name Green in the Carolinas).  Borka then returned to Dubrinics before 1906 where she remained. 
     Mary Swetz' siblings included brothers Michael and Charles and sisters Bertha and Anna.

Surnames of descendants' of Frank and Mary Thomas include Akerbloom, Conner, Fischer, Heading, Healey, Kolojeski, Moody, Mizwinski, Nazdrowicz and Thomas.

Michael Swetz (Mary Swetz' brother) was born as Mihaly Svecz in Dubrinics, Hungary in 1887.  Michael married Mary Fedelesh about 1912.  Michael Swetz died at the age of 55 on 9/19/1942 in Binghamton, NY.  See Stone.

Mary Swetz was born as Maria Fedelesh in Zaricovo, Hungary on 8/12/1892.  She sailed on the S.S. Acquitania from Cherbourg on 11/5/1921 arriving in New York City on 11/11/1921 enroute to her husband Michael in Plainsville, PA.  Mary Swetz died at the age of 99 on 11/25/1991 in Binghamton, NY.  See Stone.  Mary Swetz' parents were Ira Fedelesh and Mary Hapac.  Mary Swetz had four brothers and two sisters.     

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Copyright 2004, 2007, Gregory Kolojeski. All Rights Reserved.
This page was last updated 04/12/07